Srixon ZX5 Vs. Ping G425 Irons Comparison Overview

When it comes to irons, Ping and Srixon produce some of the most impressive ones. You have probably already heard of the Ping G425 irons and the Srixon ZX5 irons as they are both very popular models.

But how much do you really know about them? If you are considering buying either set or even an individual club from either of these sets, start your research here. Today we will be taking a look at the strengths, weaknesses, similarities and differences between the Ping G425 and Srixon ZX5 irons.

Srixon ZX5 Irons Overview

The Srixon ZX5 irons are loaded with premium appointments that offer all-around performance for mid to low handicap players.

One of the things we like the most about the Srixon ZX5 irons is that they are fully forged. The bodies are forged from carbon steel while the face is forged from SUP10 steel which is a chromium spring steel alloy. This not only gives these irons an incredible feel that the G425’s can’t match; but it helps with distance too.

The combination of materials creates a metal-wood effect that helps increase ball speeds. The Srixon ZX5 also feature progressive grooves – sharper and narrower in the short irons and shallower in the long irons. The result is acute spin control around the green and stymied spin in the long irons.

Ping G425 Irons Overview

The Ping G425 irons have a compact head design so they too would also be best for mid to low handicappers.

Oddly enough though, the Ping G425 irons are more forgiving than the Srixon ZX5’s even though they have almost exactly the same head sizes. Like the Srixon ZX5 irons, the G425’s are cavity back irons. They produced higher launch for us than the Srixon ZX5 irons did.

The Ping G425 irons also feature perimeter weighting in the form of tungsten in the toe screw and hosel. The variable face thickness design also helps preserve ball speed on mis-hits. Overall though, the Ping G425’s didn’t feel as nice as the Srixon ZX5’s and provided less lateral workability.

Both of these irons would be good for mid to low handicappers. The G425’s have better launch angles but the Srixon ZX5’s make up for that with acute spin around the green. The Srixon ZX5’s also played longer for our low handicap testers while our high handicap testers got more distance from the G425’s.

Srixon ZX5 Irons  – First Impressions

The Srixon ZX5 irons are a major improvement over the Srixon Z585 irons which had a cheaper, more game improvement look about them.

The first thing we noticed about these irons is how nice they look. Srixon got rid of the back insert which made the previous Srixon irons look a bit cheap. The Srixon ZX5’s on the other hand have the look of a premium set of forged irons.

They have a sharp, sleek look even as the cavity back pokes out a little more noticeably in the long irons.

Another reason we think the Srixon ZX5 irons would be good for mid handicappers is the amount of offset you see at point of address. The Srixon ZX5’s have a moderate amount of offset that is enough to inspire confidence but not enough to make these look like a pure set of game improvement irons.

Srixon did a good job of making the Srixon ZX5’s occupy the middle ground between player’s performance and game improvement irons. When compared to the ZX7’s you will notice that the top line is a bit thicker.

The Srixon ZX5’s also have longer blades than the ZX7’s. However, this is to be expected. The ZX7’s are definitely more of a pure set of player’s performance irons and emphasize workability over forgiveness. Still, the Srixon ZX5’s aren’t much bigger than the ZX7’s.

Ping G425 Irons First Impressions

After taking 2020 off, the G425 Irons are a much anticipated upgrade to the G410’s and the first thing you notice with these irons is that the heads are smaller and more compact.

The irons incorporate two weights, a visible screw at the front of the clubhead and a weight in the hosel. This, coupled with the wide and cascading sole allows a quality ball launch angle.

Ping have gone for the metal wood style material for the first time in a set of irons and the variable face thickness allows for a lot of forgiveness and ball speed on any strike, even when you hit the ball off center.

They also have a multi material badge filling in the cavity at the back to dampen any vibrations on mishits.

The irons have a slight bit of offset for forgiveness but you are going to get plenty of feel from these especially from Irons you would classify as game improvement.

Srixon ZX5 Irons Selling Points

  • Multi-material construction
  • Tungsten toe weights in the long irons
  • “V” shaped sole
  • Narrower, deeper face grooves in the scoring irons
  • Milled back side

G425 Selling Points

  • Metal Wood Finish
  • Multi Badge Material
  • Small, More Compact Heads
  • Perimeter Weighting
  • Excellent Feel And Control
  • More Performance From A Smaller Head

Who Are the Srixon ZX5 Irons for?

Srixon isn’t wrong when they say that the Srixon ZX5’s will have something to offer players of all skill levels. But after testing these irons, it’s clear that the players that stand to gain the most from these irons are mid handicappers.

They offer a moderate degree of workability which will suit the needs of players who are just starting to learn how to work the ball to their advantage on the fairway. Both the long and short irons have enough stopping power for the mid handicapper as well.

While the longer irons sacrifice a bit of spin control in favor of forgiveness and distance, we think most mid handicappers will be able to overlook this minor flaw. And since most mid handicappers will still want a moderate degree of forgiveness, the longer blades and thicker soles of the Srixon ZX5’s will suit them better than the ZX7 irons.

The Srixon ZX Family of Irons

The Srixon like of ZX irons also includes the popular Srixon ZX7 irons. The ZX7 irons have less offset, thinner top lines and thinner soles across the board so at point of address, they may scare some mid and high handicappers away.

However, you do get acute spin control from the scoring irons and excellent workability. Like the Srixon ZX5 irons, the ZX7’s are also fully forged. They also feature tungsten weights in the toes of the longer irons to help keep the blade from turning over.

As you might expect from a set of player’s performance irons, the ZX7’s also have stronger loft characteristics than the ZX5’s. Everything is the same up until the five iron: the Srixon ZX5 5-iron is 24 degrees while the 5-iron of the ZX7 set is 25 degrees.

So you do get slightly higher launch and sharper descent angles from the Srixon ZX7 irons starting with the 5-iron. Again though, this is pretty much to be expected from a set that is geared towards lower handicap players.

Distance: 94/100

Accuracy: 93/100

Forgiveness: 93/100

Feel & Control: 95/100

Overall Score: 93/100

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Who Are The G425 Irons For?

The Ping Irons aren’t going to be for every beginner. These irons will be incredible popular for improving and better players who want to get more feel on the ball without sacrificing forgiveness and consistency.

If you are someone who wants to starting working the ball a bit more, the G425’s are a perfect choice.

Ping G425 Family Of Irons

The G425 Irons also come in a crossover version which are black in color and the steel face on the crossover maximizes the distance you can get with G425 Crossovers.

Distance: 95/100

Accuracy: 95/100

Forgiveness: 94/100

Feel And Control: 93/100

Overall Score: 94/100

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