Callaway Rogue ST Max Vs Cobra Aerojet Irons Comparison Overview

Cobra has always kind of done things their own way and have never been shy about utilizing unique design elements in their clubs.

On the other side of the coin is Callaway which is a company that keeps the design of their clubs more traditional.

This difference can be seen when you compare the new Cobra Aerojet irons to the Callaway Rogue ST Max irons. But which irons are better? Find out in the following comparison overview.

Callaway Rogue ST Max Irons Overview

 

“The Callaway Rogue ST Max irons will help you launch missiles down the fairway.”

For game improvement irons, these clubs are very strong-lofted which we’re all for. The 9-iron checks in at 36.5° but the undercuts are substantial enough to balance everything out. These irons feature 450 grade steel faces which are very reactive and give good feedback.

You will know when you mis-hit the ball which won’t be very often since the sweet spot is the size of Texas. The long irons have an astounding 62 grams of tungsten to lower the CG and stabilize the head.

The distance and the forgiveness of these irons was very impressive; just don’t expect much in the way of workability. On average, our testers were getting 159.3 yards from the 6-iron in this set. Our testers also mentioned that it was difficult to intentionally mis-hit to produce a hard draw which means these fly incredibly straight.

Cobra Aerojet Irons Overview

“The innovation that Cobra is known for is on display in the Cobra Aerojet irons.”

The Cobra Aerojet irons feature a new suspended weight. The weight essentially floats in the head. It is suspended by connection points in the toe and heel areas. This unique design does two things: it lowers the CG and increases forgiveness on mis-hits and it also works to stiffen the head.

What you get is a very solid set of irons that won’t puns you harshly on mis-hits. The Cobra Aerojet irons are more compact than the Rogue ST max irons so you can also expect more workability from them.

“We liked the overall performance of the Cobra Aerojet irons. Around the pin, you can work them and control your launch angles. From distance, you can cover a lot of ground with them. The Callaway Rogue ST Max irons are good game improvement irons; but they are nearly hopeless when it comes to accuracy and workability.”

Callaway Rogue ST Irons First Impressions

The first thing we noticed about the Callaway Rogue ST irons is that they felt incredibly stable on full swings.

While high handicappers may not fully appreciate that benefit at first, it will certainly spoil them as they get better.

The large head sizes of the Max models will be a bit off-putting for lower handicappers; but that is what the Pro line is for.

All of the Max models have a wide sole that you can see from point of address.

Again this will look more comforting in the eyes of a beginner or high handicapper. Our testers also noted the near-effortless launch of almost all the irons in the set.

Key Tech

The clubs are packing all the latest technology too:

We’ve now got urethane microspheres up to the 6th groove which helps give a smoother feel and nicer sound.

A.I Optimized flash face to give a solid connection anywhere on the face and optimization for launch, spin and distance.

The Tungsten weighting is in the extremities of the head and allows for the sweet spot to cover more of the face, up to 260% more Tungsten than the Mavrik irons.

Cobra Aerojet Irons – First Impressions

“Right away, we liked the moderate footprint of these irons.”

We could just tell by looking at them out of the packaging that they would suit the needs of a wide variety of everyday golfers. They look forgiving, are forgiving and will provide you the launch angles you need for any kind of lie. Around the pin, you can unleash their full launch potential to nail fast greens. And from distance, the naturally low launch will give you piercing trajectory and ball speed.

The Cobra Iron Family

“The T-rail irons are also a handy choice for high handicappers.”

They sport a hybrid iron design with baffler rails to help you glide through rough turf. These are definitely for players scoring above 100.

Callaway Rogue ST Selling Points

  • Up to 62 grams of tungsten weighting
  • 450 grade steel faces
  • Pronounced soles
  • A.I. designed Flash Face Cup design
  • Layers of urethane
  • Strong lofts

Cobra Aerojet Irons Selling Points

  • Moderate sole width
  • Great for high handicappers
  • They provide enough launch around the pin
  • They are forgiving
  • They have a smooth feel at impact

Who are the Callaway Rogue ST Irons for?

The Callaway Rogue ST irons are mostly for high handicappers. The three different Max models are certainly for beginner to intermediate players while the Pro model would be better for single-digit handicappers.

But don’t get the wrong idea. The three Callaway Rogue ST Max irons aren’t as beginner-friendly when compared to some other irons. Just like we explained when we compared them to the Big Bertha’s, the Callaway Rogue ST irons are just a bit more refined than your average distance/game-improvement irons.

While most of the Callaway Rogue ST iron family is focused on upping the ball speed of high handicap players, the Pro model has a lot to offer more skilled players. Speaking of the different Callaway Rogue ST models…

The Callaway Rogue ST Iron Family

Callaway Rogue ST Max

The Rogue ST Max irons have the heaviest tungsten weight (62 grams) of any other Rogue ST iron. The head is not quite as big as the other Max models so it sits somewhere between the Rogue ST Pro and the other two Rogue ST Max models.

Callaway Rogue ST Max OS

If you need a little bit of draw bias in your irons, the pronounced offset of the Max OS irons will be helpful for you. Compared to the Callaway Rogue ST Max irons, the Max OS’s also have slightly stronger lofts. As a result the Max OS irons are more forgiving out near the toe.

Callaway Rogue ST Max OS Lite

As you can imagine, the Callaway Rogue ST Max OS Lite model is almost identical to the Callaway Rogue ST Max OS model. The key differences are lighter shafts and lighter swing weights.

The Callaway Rogue ST Max OS Lite irons also have the lightest tungsten weights (46 grams in the longest iron) and produce the highest launch angles thanks to an incredibly wide sole.

Launch is also helped with stronger lofts compared to the Callaway Rogue ST Max OS irons and the fact that these irons come standard in only graphite shafts should reiterate the emphasis on light weight and easier swinging.

Callaway Rogue ST Pro

The Callaway Rogue ST Pro irons are the most unique of the bunch. They feature the smallest head sizes and muscle backs. They also have a hollow body design. The spirit of the Rogue irons is still alive even in the Pro models though.

For instance, the Callaway Rogue ST Pro irons feature split weighting in the toe and heel to increase MOI and improve ball speeds on shots away from the sweet spot. So while they offer better spin dynamics, they are still pretty forgiving.

Ball speed is still there in the long irons as well – you’ll just have to be a lot more accurate.

Distance: 94/100

Accuracy: 90/100

Forgiveness: 93/100

Feel & Control: 91/100

Overall Score: 92/100

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Who Are the Cobra Aerojet Irons for?

“The Cobra Aerojet irons would be a great choice for high handicappers looking to score a set that will still be of use to them as they improve.”

While spin control was a bit lacking (especially in the shorter irons), our testers really didn’t care because of how forgiving these irons are. They provide great distance thanks to the naturally strong loft but are tempered nicely by a sizable undercut cavity and moderate soles.

Distance: 96/100

Forgiveness: 96/100

Workability: 94/100

Feel & Control: 95/100

Overall Score: 95/100

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